FANDOM


Vine
VineTheRuins
Naming
Binomen Unknown (probably inexistent)
Physiology
Average height Unknown
Intelligence
Sapience Unknown
Aggressivity Extreme
Ecology
Habitat Northern part of the Yucatán Peninsula in Mexico (map)
Diet Carnivorous
Lifespan Unknown
Subspecies None
Status Data Deficient
Behind the Scenes
Universe The Ruins
Created by Scott Smith

"Vines" are an unnamed species of parasitic vines that appears in the book/film The Ruins.

Reproduction Edit

There are three ways that normal plants can reproduce. Most plants reproduce by making seeds. Making seeds requires pollination, and pollination requires animals, birds, insects, etc., to carry the pollen from one plant to another. Since living creatures avoided the vines, pollination between flowers on the vines could only occur by wind transport. Other plants can spread underground by sending runners (also known as stolons), like the grasses, or by growing tubers or bulbs, like potatoes and onions. A third method of spreading is by walking, where the plant produces offshoots, like vines, that take root wherever they touch ground. The vines at the ruins could have reproduced and/or spread by any of these means. A fourth way the vines seemed to be spreading is by producing offshoots that take root whenever they touch skin. Then, like some insects, they burrow into the skin and grow inside the host.

In Mayan Culture Edit

Since the ruins are Mayan ruins, the vines are probably related with their culture. One of the theories says that the vines may have acquired their taste for blood from Mayan sacrifices, other suggests that the Mayans may have—as the present day's natives may do—worshipped them like a god or something divine (although containing them with salt).

Ad blocker interference detected!


Wikia is a free-to-use site that makes money from advertising. We have a modified experience for viewers using ad blockers

Wikia is not accessible if you’ve made further modifications. Remove the custom ad blocker rule(s) and the page will load as expected.